Solving for X

We’ll have nine product portfolios with dozens of nifty products.

Size is a conundrum for startups like Humaginarium. We’re born infinitesimally small with no employees, no address, no products, no customers, and no capital. Unlike most hatchlings, we don’t even have parents to foster our growth. We start with just an idea and then a panoply of ideas as immaterial as energy. Yet somehow ideas cause startups to grow. How?

Or more specifically, how fast, how large, and to what end? The answers seem irregular and obscure to me. I listen to How I Built This, the invaluable podcast hosted by Guy Raz, and every success story is more than different; it’s unique. I attend fireside chats with VCs like Ben Horowitz and haven’t caught a whiff of the secret sauce. On the other hand experts like Ron Adner, Chris Anderson, Steve Blank, Geoffrey Moore, Alex Osterwalder, Eric Ries, and Noam Wasserman have published standard methods, tools, templates, and models to explain how startups grow, but I’m still not convinced they figured it out. For one thing, many fine entrepreneurs haven’t read their books or followed their advice. For another, many like me, who did, found it’s about as useful as scripture for writing code.

Yet growth is crucial. So I’m pondering “how I’ll build this” along lines like these. Two years ago we started at an infinitesimally small Point A. We’re now advancing to a minimally viable Point B. In a few years we’ll end up at a big Point X, when we make our way to the exit.

I know what Point A looks like. It’s the company I founded named Humaginarium LLC. We’re earnestly building Point B. It’s named Diabetes Agonistes, our very first minimally viable product with at least one paying customer (hopefully more than one). I’m using the Unit Model Method to inform the design so that it’s repeatable and scalable. Because Diabetes Agonistes has to contain DNA for transforming intellectual energy into subject matter that consumers will learn with and enjoy again and again and again. Without that, it’s just a game.

Now what about Point X? As I say, I’m working on it, but I don’t care much for cookie cutters and a unit model feels a bit like one of those. Make it once, sell it many times. That’s not for me. I want to make many things once and sell each of them many times. This ambition leads me out of the neighborhood of type 2 diabetes and into the realm of chronic illness.

To my way of thinking, Humaginarium is a safe and trustworthy place where people of all stripes go to reckon with their chronic illness, and have fun with it, and practice killing it. Starting with type 2 diabetes and ending with… what?

The answer goes something like this. Diabetes Agonistes is a product. It’s going to lodge in a product portfolio. All told we’ll have nine product portfolios in Humaginarium with dozens of nifty products. The nine portfolios are:

  1. Cancerous
  2. Cardiovascular
  3. Endocrinological (home of diabetes)
  4. Hepatic
  5. Immunological
  6. Neurological
  7. Renal
  8. Respiratory
  9. Rheumatological

Have I left out any types of chronic illness? I have indeed, but I also included enough to bound what Humaginarium is, and what it isn’t. It’s very big, huge actually, but exactly the size needed to bend the curve of the #1 cause of sickness, suffering, and death in the United States and worldwide.

If you already know that half of humanity has at least one chronic illness, and if you already know that chronic illness is our #1 killer, and if you already know what each chronic illness is, and if you already know what you can do about it, then you are much farther along than millions of regular folks who may want Humaginarium because we built something they need. Therein lies Point X.

William-Adolphe_Bouguereau_Seated_Nude_(1884)

Scientific entertainment. Variation on Seated Nude, by William Bouguereau

Author: Robert S. Becker, Phd

Founder and CEO of Humaginarium LLC

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