Literacy

Caring for a human body requires diligence, a force that is powered by health literacy.

My website says “Humaginarium is a systematic and evidence-based way to increase health literacy.” Let’s slow that down for a closer look.

For me at least, all literacy is a situated competency. There are no universal definitions and standards. Instead literacy is a personal, differentiated and evolving attribute. Yet somehow it always encompasses the same four generative acts: recognizing information, understanding it, relating it, and using it. If folks can reliably do these four things appropriate to their circumstances, they’re literate though maybe – probably – in dissimilar ways.

Recognizing information is knowing what something is. We naturally recognize information when encountering the source of it. Understanding is discovering and pondering the meaning of information. For example understanding why Ingres spent decades painting The Source (shown at the bottom of this post) in his unique way; and understanding why it is perfectly beautiful like that. Relating is assigning context to information so that it fits functionally or imaginatively into one’s world view. I related (and distorted) The Source by inserting a concocted cellular view of water, in order to reveal dangerous bacteria supposedly living in it. Using is working with information. My job with Ingres was to bridge an aesthetic divide between art and science. I tried to embody “scientific entertainment” – and also have fun (respectfully) with a great work of art.

Since I haven’t mentioned reading so far, I’ll pause now for a confession. I trained and practiced as a professor of English. Before technology barged into my life I taught college students how to learn from the literature and history they read. This was my vocation: increasing literacy by means of text. To this day I enjoy and learn more from reading than anything else I do, yet I don’t feel that literacy is fundamentally about scanning text. Reading is only one way to recognize information, often not the best way, and certainly not the way that Humaginarium promotes health literacy.

My notion of health literacy aligns with the four-part model of recognize, understand, relate, and use. Health literacy is all of that, only situated in health. Sounds pretty straightforward, but it isn’t.

First there’s the wrinkle of “health.” By that I mean the condition of a human body, the physical thing one calls “my life.” Health is neither illness nor wellness, diagnosis nor treatment, scheduling nor adhering. Health is the sum total of a human body and health literacy is a person’s ability to recognize, understand, relate, and use information concerning the body.

Next there’s the wrinkle of information. Information about the human body is extremely hard to take in because most of it is hidden in layered systems so complex and mysterious that they’re nothing less than magical. I’m using that term literally. Our living bodies are miraculous no matter what condition they’re in. They’re just very hard to make sense of.

There are more wrinkles with understanding, relating and using information about the body. Few regular folks ever even consider most of that information; they can’t understand the scientific and medical rhetoric used to express it, and they have little or no idea how to use it. Let’s be candid: for most folks, using information about the body is limited to consumption, procreation and labor – and most of that can be done well enough without health literacy.

Then why bother with it? Well, I think health literacy enhances acceptance of what the human body is, how it works, what it needs and why it’s in each person’s practical self-interest to care – with gobs of curiosity and courage. Caring for a human body requires diligence, a force that is powered by health literacy.

As health literacy increases, so does medical efficacy and the capacity for self-care. Those are two horsemen of a long-awaited apocalypse that may bring a failing health care industry to its knobby knees and replace it with the best health care possible. The kind that every individual with a chronic illness, regardless of educational or socioeconomic situation, constructs for themselves. Those are the folks who may benefit most from Humaginarium.

Scientific Entertainment. Variation on The Source (1856) by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres. Pictured with Vibrio vulnificus, a type of waterborne, flesh-eating bacteria.

Author: Robert S. Becker, Phd

Founder and CEO of Humaginarium LLC

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