Masquerade

In Humaginarium everybody wears a mask.

Wearing a protective mask is a cardinal rule for avoiding and preventing the spread of Covid-19. Refusing to wear a mask is a cockamamy badge of libertarian courage. We may choose the wearing in order to conserve health and well-being, or not wearing as a privilege of personal freedom, or lazily decide nothing and go with the flow (if you want, whatever, fuggedaboutit). Options 2-3 may be the most popular in the United States during this pandemic, as indicated by tragic health statistics and my personal observations of Joe and Ms Sixpack in the heartland.

Of course any resistance to masking is ludicrous. Masks are just materials that cover the face; and the less we see of some faces (e.g. orange ones), the better! Covering the face is what many people do every normal day at work, in sports and weather, with cosmetics, coiffure. fashion, and also on special occasions like Halloween and bank heists. Masks are useful, sometimes attractive; they don’t challenge habits and lifestyles or interfere with work or play or even sleep. To refuse to wear a mask for the sake of conserving health (yours and others) isn’t courageous in any sense of the word; it’s stubborn, selfish and stupid. That kind of dull, intransigent behavior is fairly common when it comes to health (e.g. resistance to medicine and proper nutrition), so we’re accustomed to it, but that doesn’t make it right.

For hundreds of millions of years, masks have evolved in nature for protection, disguise, self-expression of animals and plants. Homo sapiens have never grown masks on their bodies, of course, but we started crafting them for ceremonial and practical purposes in the Iron Age, tens of thousands of years ago. Our oldest extant masks were fashioned by ancestors in the Judean Hills near Jerusalem, about 7,000 years before Christ arrived there. In ancient historic times, participants in Greek bacchanalia, Roman saturnalia and medieval carnivals donned masks; likewise today’s revelers at Mardi Gras, the Carnival of Brazil and countless other festivities wear brilliant costumes including masks. They love doing it!

Humans are fond of masks because they enjoy pretending to be something or somebody else. It seems to take a load off! Creative pretense involving masks gives pleasure, makes meaning, does magic, creates illusions, enhances beauty, produces power and advantages. We masquerade in order to escape mundane reality and replace it, for a while, with a contrived fantasy. We do this to see ourselves, not as we are in mirrors, but in dreams where we drive a Batmobile or leap over tall buildings. That’s why masks have purportedly played a crucial role in understanding “what it means to be human.” They facilitate escapism and catharsis, which are also two major benefits of Humaginarium.

In fact Humaginarium is health promotion masquerading as interactive entertainment. Meaning: it’s a thing pretending to be something else. In order to deceive? On the contrary: in order to reveal complicated, difficult, unpleasant yet vitally important truth. To the Sixpacks of course, and others.

Those who choose to attend masquerade balls hosted by Humaginarium in the cloud get to escape into fantasies of adventure and exploration of the world within, the world every human being creates and sustains and sometimes suffers, every single day of their lives. It’s a world so large and dynamic and awful and mysterious and elusive and beautiful and threatening and comforting that it boggles the mind, until the mind urges retreat, thinking “this cannot be, this fantasy is bewildering and false.”

The rational mind, when it thinks that about any fantasy including ours, is incorrect. The actual world within truly is as vast and intriguing as the Milky Way, just as present to our senses, even more accessible to our understanding. That’s why Humaginarium hosts creative expeditions there. There is so much to discover and celebrate and use.

Folks who thrive on fantasy in Humaginarium also have a dream that governs their choices and decisions and helps them persist even when the challenges of simulation seem insurmountable. Their dream is to leave behind the dreadful chronic illness they had when they entered. Not to be miraculously cured, only to be free and proud and in control for once and in their minds forever.

A masquerade is precisely the right way to do this, though it is never otherwise done in healthcare or health education. When Joe or the Ms arrive for a medical appointment in the real world, they never wear masks and neither does clinical staff. From start to finish of their helpless, hapless, horribly expensive visit, they listen carefully to diagnoses they don’t understand, prescriptions they won’t take and instructions they won’t follow. That unfortunately is their sad reality.

In Humaginarium everybody wears a mask. Everybody is free and empowered to explore what it’s like to be something or somebody else, for a while: what it’s like to be a happy human being whose perfect body is healthy and strong because they themselves decided it must and it shall be.

Author: Robert S. Becker, Phd

Founder and CEO of Humaginarium LLC

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