Think

The way in which we think about a disease has an effect on the outcome.

“The trouble with every one of us,” said Thomas Watson in 1912, “is that we don’t think enough. We don’t get paid for working with our feet — we get paid for working with our heads.” Soon after that, Watson famously made “THINK” the enduring mantra of IBM.

IMHO, there are far more important reasons to think than to make money. Even so, a few decades after IBM asked “every one of us” to think more, our nation’s moral savior observed: “Rarely do we find men who willingly engage in hard, solid thinking. Nothing pains some people more than having to think.”

That observation jives with my personal experience of folks, but Martin Luther King Jr. didn’t leave it at that. He added that people should be “tough-minded,” in order to think well (not just more). They need to become sharp, penetrating, astute, discerning (his words). Cognitively attentive and retentive, yes; but also inquisitive, brave, original, determined (my words).

The modern notion that everybody should be “tough-minded” was taken up by the United Negro College Fund in 1972, a few years after MLK’s sacrifice. UNCF coined a moving slogan that became a building block of popular American culture to this day: “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.” Watson apparently felt the same way.

And so did Michael Jackson in 1988 when he brought the tough-minded man to the stage as a Man in the Mirror, daring arenas full of crazy fans to think different about what matters most to all of us. A decade after that, Steve Jobs started urging everybody, everywhere, to Think Different — picturing MLK and several like-minded luminaries in Apple spots during the Super Bowl.

Is that man in the mirror — thinking and moreover thinking differently — really the same as a person who is tough-minded? Practically they are the same, in my view.

How might such noble people avoid wasting their minds on this terrible and beautiful planet? Perhaps by “breaking through the crust of legends and myths and sifting the true from the false.” That’s MLK again, lofty and authentic at the same time: his rare and urgent gift.

The problem with urging everybody to think, though, is that nobody really understands what that means. Everybody thinks of course, but who really knows how or even why?

You think I’m exaggerating? Think again. People are much better at being told what to do than demanding to think things out for themselves. That seems to be true throughout American health care (my pet peeve), where the tough-minded are providers only, and most patients are milquetoast.

The dreadful implications of that intellectual disparity in health care hit home when I read Normal Cousins’ Head First: The Biology of Hope (1989), where he claims “The way in which we think about a disease has an effect on the outcome.” Hold on, did you get that? The way we think changes our own clinical outcomes. Since when has thinking become medicinal?

Probably since the placebo effect was felt, roughly at the beginning of human civilization. Then as now, people tend to avoid, prevent and recover from illness by thinking wellness. You can’t think wellness without some proverbial fire in the belly, but if you have that —if you’re tough-minded — you may be able to defend your body against threats and frailties right along with the surgery and the drugs and the annual checkups you may think your body depends on.

Most people don’t think wellness when it comes to their bodies, not because they can’t, but because it’s incredibly hard. Humaginarium makes it easier by using slick technology, but it’s still hard. Nobody gets to think Diabetes Agonistes is a walk in the park. It’s more like a slog through Mirkwood, and I wouldn’t want it any other way. Nor would Thomas, Martin, Michael, Steve or Norman. Nor should you.

“One of the unfortunate aspects of health education,” wrote Cousins, “is that it tends to make us more aware of our weaknesses than of our strengths. By focusing our attention and concerns on things that can go wrong, we tend to develop a one-sided view of the human body, regarding it as a ready receiver for all sorts of illnesses. Proper health education should begin with an awareness of the magnificent resources built into the human system.”

Diabetes Agonistes isn’t proper health education. It isn’t health education at all, but it does develop keen awareness of magnificent resources of the body, resources available to the person who owns the body and whose life depends on it.

You know who that person is: the man or the woman in your mirror, longing for you to toughen up your mind and think different.

Author: Robert S. Becker, Phd

Founder and CEO of Humaginarium LLC

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