Learning

The most desperate problems emerging from chronic illness have a surname: Vulnerability.

Humaginarium is entertainment for consumers who have, risk, or wonder about chronic illness. Participation is voluntary. Nobody is forced or cajoled to join. Like a carnival barker, the only promise we make is fun. It’s important to say this because unlike presenters of classic health education, Humaginarium must offer art that regular folks like and want for its own sake, whether or not it solves their problems.

Thanks to art, Humaginarium probably has more in common with medicine than bland health education does. Truly? Well yes, because medicine historically is a mixture of art and science, with art doing the lion’s share of the job until the mid 20th century. Even today in the technical vanguard of biomedicine, art is a critical component of what matters to most people: healing and wellness. When medical arts are eclipsed by instrumentation and data, health care can begin to seem manipulative and futile, if not ridiculous, to the folks it serves.

Humaginarium likewise is a mixture of art and science. Though we don’t boast about solving problems, that’s actually why we exist. Real-life problems; often unacknowledged, misunderstood, denied, hidden, scorned, or ignored by the kinds of folks who buy video games for escapist fantasy rather than useful information. As they enjoy the experiences we prepare for them, their health issues are pulled through an aesthetic ringer I call catharsis. That’s pretty much the same ringer that doctors and shamans have used for millennia and still use today.

In my view all the most desperate problems caused by chronic illness have a surname: Vulnerability. By that I mean weak defenses against illness and the clueless pursuit of wellness. Vulnerable consumers don’t make themselves better; they let things get worse. They don’t relish the esoteric complexity of the body; they’re obsessed with appearances. They don’t ask hard questions they can’t begin to answer; they delegate that to experts who know everything. Experience eventually shows how little medical experts actually know and how risky and inefficient such delegation can be.

As a problem solver, Humaginarium is not paternalistic. It doesn’t tell consumers what to think or do beyond one simple command: win the game. That’s their mandate. Thing is, they have to figure out how to win. On their own. They can share ideas and experience with peers, but they can’t delegate.

Instead players build their own knowledge and make their own choices in their own self-interest; and health literacy emerges. This learning style is called constructionism. You’ll find it in healthcare simulations for medical students and physicians, but you won’t find it in health education for patients who need it just as much. Why? That doesn’t matter. It’s about to change.

Consumers initially come to Humaginarium not for information or simulation or education of any kind, but to be amused. To enjoy a virtual experience of the human body in its battle with unfair, unfeeling, out-of-control destiny. As in all their favorite video games, players must develop new competencies to win. But this time their gains deliver more than make-believe victories.

Capabilities learned in Humaginarium are wholly transferable. A fight for health in our fantasy prepares people for a similar fight in real life where, maybe for the first time, they’ll deeply understand and strive to control existential threats like diabetes, cancer, or heart disease. We want them to bring better defenses against illness and longings for wellness to the battle. Ones that fit their own circumstances more or less perfectly.

When that happens, Humaginarium may perform like a magical healing art of the 21st Century.