Mind

The woke mind is a powerful ally of the wounded body.

Humaginarium is novel health promotion. With reverence for life science, it invites folks to discover how a healthy body works; and how the body may be induced to work better and last longer, despite chronic illness.

Okay the body, fine, but what about the mind? Does Humaginarium also revere perception, cognition, emotion, philosophy? Does it deem intangible mental phenomena as important for controlling and improving health?

The answer is yes, indubitably. Our novel health promotion posits that the mind is a lever of constructive health competence; that the woke mind is a powerful ally of the wounded body.

Moreover mental faculties, including the imagination, may be more practical and influential than dumbass regimens of behavioral conditioning. You know them: nudges, digital wearables, involuntary adherence, habits; the palaver of wellness. Easy to ignore because effective people rarely just follow instructions or accept manipulation. They seek to understand, and that’s especially true of those dealing with chronic illness.

Lately, my naive beliefs and assumptions about the mind have been sorely tested by COVID-19, likewise by the history of pandemics that previously obliterated swaths of humanity. In some ways, 2020 feels like 1520, when it comes to epidemiology. There is discouraging consistency, through all ages, of the failure by folks to understand, or even seek to understand, pathogenesis.

Of course, I’m not speaking of scientists and doctors, who administer remedies, who issue proclamations, recommendations, precautions. I’m speaking here of the untutored masses who tend to avoid, ignore, deny, resist, attack and refute health experts along with their intelligent advice. I’m speaking of neighbors whose leaden minds have empowered viral molecules to become proficient mass murderers, in the name of economic prosperity, political ideology, religious dogma and other cockamamie prejudices. I’m speaking about my customers.

Humaginarium promises constructive health competence to these same customers, knowing full well that human competence is based on critical thinking. Competence is the ability to control and improve your health, first by understanding it, then by skillfully — dammit willfully — mastering myriad determinants of health.

Competence isn’t calling a doctor for an appointment or a prescription; it isn’t subscribing to reminder text messages, or reading labels on vials. Constructive health competence is making informed, often brave, choices and decisions in order to minimize risks, in sickness and in health.

Conventional health promotion doesn’t share my worry about the untutored masses. It tends to leapfrog the mind anyway, as if folks don’t have one, rushing to pump procedural, behavioral bromides into their muscle memory. Don’t smoke. Just say no. Get more exercise. Cut out simple sugars. Eat more vegetables. Take your meds. Get tested. Fast after midnight. Buy health insurance. I could fill a blog with the most common commands of health promotion before getting to one that says something like, “seek to understand first,” or “begin with the end in mind.”

My objection to procedural and behavioral orders in health promotion is that they don’t matter and they don’t work. We have statistics to prove that. Yet my growing worry about getting folks to figure out health, and act accordingly, is that they seem averse to intellectual struggle. Thinking is slow and hard!

I want folks to make better choices and decisions, based on their own felt needs and understanding. To judge by the conduct of crowds who ignored copious, relentless public health information for most of this year, folks tend to act like they won’t think. So there is nothing there on which to build health competence.

Or is there? Remember that Humaginarium doesn’t promote health with pedagogy. It is not health education. It relies on art and entertainment, on learning from the experience of fantasy. Regular folks, the same ones who act like they don’t have a mind when it comes to their bodies, are able to shoulder fairly large cognitive loads when using their imagination.

Obviously, despite appearances, folks do have good minds, and moreover their minds are ready to absorb and use sophisticated concepts and techniques, provided that these are experienced in ways that arouse rather than stultify, engage rather than dictate obedience. Arouse and engage, as in video games.

Do you doubt it? Then you don’t know gamers. Want convincing? There is half a century of scholarly research awaiting your attention. If you lack time to review it, check out The Hole in the Wall Project for an epitome.

Still skeptical? Then close your eyes and recall when you learned more and better than at any other time in your life. If you’re like most of us, that was in your infancy and early childhood.

You learned then the way gamers learn as adults: by experiencing, practicing, pretending, figuring things out. If lately you’ve declined to wear a mask and social distance, your mind is probably AWOL and your body — your health — is on the line.

That’s bad, but things could be worse. Humaginarium wants you to make them better. By seeking to understand your body and health, first.

Scientific entertainment. Costume of a plague doctor nicknamed Dr Beaky of Rome (1721), by Paul Fürst. The doctor wears a face mask and socially distances, to avoid infection. NB that was 300 years ago, before the advent of modern microbiology.