Fantasy

Transforming the body from oozing, sticky humors into a cosmic miracle.

A more explicit way of saying “scientific entertainment” is “biological fantasy.” Both may be rare enough to qualify for trademark protection, provided they actually make sense and are useful. Do they, and are they?

Scientific entertainment and biological fantasy are oxymorons that label customer experience in Humaginarium. Each should negate itself because everybody knows that biology is real and fantasy is fake; that science is momentous and entertainment is merely fun. Add two polar opposites together and logically expect a nil result. Does that mean we’re making zero-sum, inconsequential mind games for customers of Humaginarium?

I don’t think so because, in the context of learning, the whole is always greater than the sum of its parts. Look at it this way. Biology is the aspect of human nature that is real and tangible, but largely invisible and incomprehensible to regular folks. How do we know? Stop somebody on the street and ask a profound question about biology, for example, “What is a stem cell?” In most neighborhoods the answer may range from clueless to ridiculous, though every human life depends on stem cells and our species would go extinct without them. In this way biology is weirdly physical, immediate, deterministic, and largely unfathomable. (By the way, that lovely blob in the illustration below is a stem cell.)

Unlike biology, fantasy purveys intangible figments of the imagination that are nonetheless visible to the mind’s eye and fairly easy to understand. That’s partly why fantasy is a massively popular art form. People get it! To test this distinction, ask somebody on the street what a soul is, and you’ll likely get a devout or convinced or passionate response. Stem cells exist in and around us, yet folks know little if anything about them. Souls don’t exist anywhere, yet they’re a ubiquitous felt presence in real life. How can this be?

Probably because fantasy isn’t fake! Unreal yes, because it’s made up; but fully-conceived fantasy is at least as meaningful and truthful as biology; in fact more so for the vast majority. In scientific entertainment or biological fantasy, consumers confront what for them is unknowable and therefore frightening (the contests of the human body with morbid threats). They confront these threats with beliefs they can grasp and control to suit their longings and needs; and that activity is motivating. Though you may never hear the word fantasy in health care, I’m pretty sure it’s an uninvited guest at every medical procedure and sleepless night of worry. Patients leave the door unlocked because fantasy doesn’t negate science; instead it makes science believable, trustworthy, and useful to them.

What sorts of fantasies are churning in Humaginarium? Obviously science fiction because we picture and animate human physiology; and simulate its progressions with computer models. Like the wings of a fairy, fantasy surrounds and moves with our biology – not in order to falsify it, but to simplify and disarm it; and make it coherent, responsive, and beautiful. The imaginative rendering of scientific subject matter is called reductionism. It’s an aesthetic at the core of all great art (including the medical arts).

Beyond science fiction, Humaginarium presents immersive fantasy that alchemizes the oxymorons into seamless perceptual experiences. Customers don’t experience science and entertainment; instead they experience scientific entertainment with breathtaking epistemic powers. We present liminal fantasy that reframes the human body, transforming it from a pool of oozing, sticky humors into the cosmic miracle that “in fact” it “really” is. We present dark fantasy marbled with infection, inflammation, deterioration, and death that is coming after you and may catch you unawares and unguarded. We present comic fantasy sparkling with cuteness and jokes that ventilate the struggle for survival with the laughter of relief. Our initial visual prototypes did this job with steampunk, which somehow works like fictional nonfiction. There’s another oxymoron for opening doors of perception.

So then, does scientific entertainment make sense? You bet it does. Is biological fantasy useful? Only for certain things, like having a happier and longer life.

Scientific entertainment. Variation on Working in Marble by Jean-Léon Gérôme