Visualizing

Our virtual human body looks and acts like an incredible video game.

Members of the Humaginarium tribe are called customers, consumers, patients, users, gamers, players, learners, and (my favorite) eyeballs. Each of the monikers emphasizes a different role. The special role performed by eyeballs is to view.

So what engages eyeballs in Humaginarium? The answer isn’t obvious. After all Humaginarium is scientific entertainment that’s not been done before at scale; has never been done for a mass market of regular folks. Members of our tribe will surely be astonished and amazed by what we show them. Will they like the show and keep coming back for more?

To increase the chances we invented an intriguing visual style in the confluence of medical and fantastical illustration. One depicts a natural, objective world of the senses. The other imagines a make-believe, subjective world of the mind.

Our medical illustration is state-of-the-art CGI of human anatomy (structure), physiology (function), and pathology (abnormality). This kind of digital visualization involves dimensional, colorful, high-resolution, high-fidelity, animated pictures. It looks sophisticated and technical, but the roots of medical illustration trace all the way back to pharaonic Egypt. It informed Classical and Renaissance science and art and continued to evolve in the centuries that followed. Modern medical illustration that leverages technology began with Spanish neuroscientist Santiago Ramón y Cajal and blossomed in American surgeon Frank Netter‘s Atlas of Human Anatomy. These artist-doctors rendered Homo sapiens in elegant and precise drawings that were (and still are) used by clinicians and educators.

New medical CGI renders Homo sapiens as discrete atoms, and complete organisms, and at every scale in between including molecular and cellular. Want to zoom a chromosome? No problem, have a look. Want to strum an auditory ossicle? Right this way, point the light. Our medical CGI prompts folks to view and manipulate every ingredient of a virtual human body without ever cutting into a real one.

This kind of visualizing is naturalistic, but is it realistic? My answer is no, because a realistic picture of anatomy, physiology, and pathology is extremely hard to parse and comprehend; and therefore not as useful. State-of-the-art medical CGI is very useful because it idealizes subject matter. The rendered biology appears true to nature, yet easy to see and experience; moreover it’s beautiful, no less than great works of art and architecture. To encounter awesome new medical illustration is to gaze in wonderment.

The beauty of medical CGI serves as a docking station for fantastical CGI. It allows actual organic matter to dovetail with absurd and ridiculous inventions; together they generate nothing short of visual magic. People have always experienced this kind of magic without thinking much about it. For example as children with a wishbone after dinner, a ringlet of hair in a locket, and a baby tooth under a pillow. In these everyday examples and in Humaginarium, the real body acts like a wardrobe that opens into Narnia.

What does our scientific Narnia look like? Well, there’s a substratum of idealized anatomy, physiology, and pathology; that’s the natural world of Homo sapiens. Pure figments of our imagination populate that world: things like gardens with unmarked paths, caves with cryptic messages etched on the walls, opalescent pools that ripple when they speak, supernatural humanoids and beasts, horrifying monsters, criminals intent on gambling momentary gratification for a lifetime of pain, immanent spirits, enchanting songs. Our fantastical CGI is overlaid on the natural kind and littered with tangible clues like those that Jules Verne created for his adventurers.

Much of the spectacle in Humaginarium throbs with attitude and nervous energy. Members of our tribe don’t stroll through an art gallery but work hard to find their ways through a maze of chronic illness, in an enchained world that yearns to be free. That’s why our virtual human body looks and acts like an incredible video game. It doesn’t invite eyeballs to observe and learn. Instead it challenges them to survive and prosper despite the odds. That is why they like the show and keep coming back for more