Briefs

What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow?

For the poet TS Eliot, April was the cruelest month. For Humaginarium, it wasn’t too shabby. It began with completion of a grant proposal and ended with a synoptic schedule and briefs for our project. We did exactly what we said we would do, and that feels nice. Hopefully a sign of things to come.

The project schedule spans 28 months, from approval of our Phase 1 Project Pitch to completion of our Phase 2 proposal. The blocks of planned activities are:

  1. Proposal development: 12 months (43%)
  2. Project preparations: 6 months (21%)
  3. Research and development: 9 months (32%)
  4. Phase 2 proposal: 1 month (4%)

Six months of slack time are anticipated, three of which we’ve already used. Slack time buffers the impact of uh-oh pivots and koala-like performance.

Our project preparations kicked off on April 6. By September 30, we’ll have devised a detailed schedule in MS Project that allocates 33 professionals and 2,000 testers to a hierarchy of tasks that aggregate in five complex, glorious, interdependent milestones. This glorious amalgam is our modular proof of concept: empirical evidence with a direct bearing on our next project starting on January 4, 2022.

The briefs are 3-4 page orientations for members of our professional cohort. They cover all the major bases of on-ramp:

  1. Content brief
  2. Creative brief
  3. Curricular brief
  4. Evaluation brief
  5. Office brief
  6. Scheduling brief
  7. Technical brief

The briefs are not restatements of our proposal, but narrative seasonings for kicking it up a notch. Since the subject matter of the briefs has been top of mind for a full year, they were surprisingly hard to write. Hopefully easy to read.

Their overarching theme may be quoted from the technical brief. It applies to everything we’re doing from now on:

Innovative popular systems are the technology of this project. We also have lofty and arguable philosophical, social and economic ideas, but the project is not about them. It is technical and pragmatic. Our only job is to demonstrate that the systems we plan to build are feasible.

The content brief concerns six classes of information that will be mustered for our simulation: biology, chemistry, psychology, environment, community and aesthetics. These data are the knowledge that we impart to users without uttering a word. Like magic.

The creative brief concerns art and entertainment. It says our greatest invention is a way to make science and education more palatable and engaging to those who couldn’t care less. It claims that Humaginarium is the most fun you can have with your body. And we mean it!

The curricular brief says that our video game inculcates a competency model that makes healthy choices and healthy habits likely, if not inevitable. There’s no teacher. Experience teaches! Our technology merely facilitates. Users get to be thank god-almighty free at last.

The evaluation brief concerns the website we will build in the digital public square to demonstrate our technical and aesthetic wizardry. Thousands of people may drop by and leave feedback, and while there enter a lottery for valuable prizes. Money can’t buy me love? Not.

The office brief describes our virtual office, which is actually our Business G Suite account with twinkling lights, glass balls and tinsel. It explains how colleagues around the United States will receive assignments, post work and get paid. Work happens, meetings are ad hoc.

The scheduling brief explains our techniques of project management that somehow combine careful planning, practically unlimited flexibility and iron-clad budgeting. We want to know how and when everything will happen, and yet not mind of it doesn’t work out that way. Zen.

The technical brief is the one I was afraid to write, because it is technical and I am not. However it pleased technical lead Dave Walker so I’m more relaxed after all. Feasibility is the gist of this brief. It poses many of the questions we must answer well to qualify for Phase 2.

So then, April at least in this case has not been the cruelest month. You may ask along with the poet, “What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow Out of this stony rubbish?” I will tell you now. They are the seedlings of health literacy, health acumen, and medical self-efficacy for patient sufferers who may not, who cannot be fooled again, because soon they will know better.