Green Light Redux

Two federal agencies have invited us to request SBIR Phase 1 funding.

I’m taking a break from game design this week to talk about progress on another front.

Back on April 10, I announced that the National Science Foundation approved Humaginarium’s Project Pitch. Today I’m announcing that the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases has approved our Specific Aims. Two US federal agencies have thus invited Humaginarium to apply in 2019 for substantial, non-dilutive, SBIR Phase 1 funding. In my opinion, that’s cool!

Specific Aims is a single page argument that our groundbreaking idea for biomedical innovation is a good fit for NIH support; and that it’s a good candidate for commercialization. I dubbed the idea Metabolic Genii.

In popular culture, a genie is Robin Williams magically springing from a bottle to make jokes and grant wishes. I’m fine with that; it fits our brand well enough, but the word genie is actually more meaningful. It’s a variant of genius, and a genius (plural: genii) is an attendant spirit: a force that influences actors for better or worse.

Metabolic genii are digital affordances that empower folks who have or risk developing metabolic disorders. The genii enable them to inquire what’s up with their bodies and gain a bit more control over their medical outcomes.

Like any genius worthy of that moniker, metabolic genii are extremely creative. Ours are creative like scientists rather than sorcerers. They intelligently pan for the personal gold in every individual they meet, ultimately enabling users to feel a little like Aladdin, with wishes that now make a lot more sense and eventually may come true.

The terminal objective of our Specific Aims is a set of six precise, repeatable techniques that reliably convert basic health literacy (acquired in a separate project) into resolute behavior. These six techniques are drawn from a social science palette that includes situational awareness, choice architecture, scenario planning, nudge theory, decision science, and reinforcement theory of motivation. According to my reading of research literature, these powerful and accessible affordances have never been synced to produce sustainable medical outcomes. We’re about to sync them in order to discover what happens next.

What do we expect to happen next? Empowerment. Users will demonstrate their ability and desire to make evidence-based decisions about illness and wellness; and furthermore make those decisions as sticky as flypaper. Sound easy? Sorry, it’s never been done before. That may be why health education mostly doesn’t work. At all.

Who is going to benefit from this project? Of course Humaginarium and its investors will benefit, but more importantly 60% of the adult population stands to benefit. That is the proportion who already have a poorly controlled chronic illness (the numbers are increasing). That’s also the proportion who play video games, the medium we are using to generate basic health literacy (and yes, those numbers are increasing too).

What will our R&D be like? It begins with a re-review of secondary research that bears on our terminal objective. From there it takes the form of agile discovery. We are not going to think this problem to death. Instead we shall design activities that a large number of experts and ordinary consumers can experience and comment with feedback. Each of these activities generates data that indicate efficacy and flow into other parts of the Metabolic Genii system.

Our Phase 1 research and development yields proof-of-concept of this system; and verifies its theoretical efficacy. If results are encouraging, we will migrate our hardening techniques into a Phase 2 design-build-test-deploy project. At that point, our world begins to resemble an oyster.

Metabolic Genii and it’s counterpart Diabetes Agonistes are now as two horses pulling a chariot named Humaginarium. Our chariot isn’t racing against competitors; there is none working at our level. We’re racing against time. We want to stymie metabolic disorders and other chronic illnesses as quickly and as soon as possible.

Click here to read the Specific Aims.

Green Light

We’re not going to leave the long and winding path, but SBIR may strengthen and speed our steps.

The National Science Foundation has given Humaginarium a green light to apply for substantial, non-dilutive, SBIR funding. The light came on right after I submitted my Project Pitch, a required first step that gauges whether Humaginarium can “meet the program’s objectives to support innovative technologies that show promise of commercial and/or societal impact and involve a level of technical risk.

The Humaginarium project seemed like a good fit way back in 2010 when I first looked into SBIR. That’s when I began ideation for this venture, years before founding it. I guess this illustrates how serendipitously I approach even things that are important to me, and how I tend to follow long and winding paths with a compass but not a map. Taking me forever!

The manifold innovative technologies I pitched to NSF include computer models of physiology, high-fidelity time-based simulations of morbidity at scale, state-of-the-art medical CGI, cloud-built and cloud-based entertainment that streams to screens everywhere. My pitch is not about inventing these incredible emerging technologies, but rather adapting them (for the first time) to the direct use and benefit of regular folks.

I pitched my belief that the Humaginarium project will have commercial and societal impact. As commerce it operates in the nexus between entertainment, health, and education: three large, fast-changing and fast-growing industries. It caters to strongly-felt consumer needs at the center of each industry – but in this unique case all at the same time, with the same products that we rapidly make and the same business processes that are noncapital intensive. As a social enterprise, Humaginarium promotes health literacy and health equity not for a few who can afford it, but for everybody who chooses to use it. If activists are leading us to a brave new world where health is a right and not a privilege, Humaginarium may become one of the enabling technologies of that world.

The level of technical risk in the Humaginarium project is pretty high. I say the work can be done, but at the same time acknowledge that it’s never been done before. I speak with the voice of a world I’ve imagined, that doesn’t yet exist: one that will deliberately avoid an apocalypse in health care by empowering self-care. I promise to make health science coherent and beautiful and playful and useful to folks who currently know almost nothing about it; and who typically don’t want to know anything about it (until it’s too late). This is truly a moonshot, one that enables “one giant leap” for every individual who takes a ticket.

In order to mitigate this crazy level of risk, I pitched a series of Phase 1 experiments that may define the most promising way forward. Not only to design, build and test an effective solution, but also to commercialize it. I say mitigate, not eliminate risk, because the Humaginarium project is a lion that doesn’t wear a leash. We won’t abandon the long and winding path because that’s where know-how and value are captured. Still, SBIR can speed and mightily strengthen our steps. The green light thrills me like a call to arms on the White Mountains.

Click here to read the Project Pitch.

Scientific Entertainment. Variation on Academic Study, by William Mulready